Why Hesychasm Mattered

This repost from several years ago discusses one of the essential differences between the old Christendom of the East and the new Christendom born of the Papal Reformation. That difference is hesychasm, and it can be seen in the iconography that was abandoned when the new Christendom turned to naturalistic painting during the Renaissance.

PARADISE AND UTOPIA

In yesterday’s post I presented the movement in fourteenth-century  eastern Christendom known as hesychasm as a sort of foil (or contrasting device) against the disaffection that was stirring at the time among western thinkers such as Petrarch. The necessary link in this case was Barlaam of Calabria, the theologian who lived temporarily in Byzantium but fell out with the hesychastic current there and ultimately returned to his native Italy. There he converted to Roman Catholicism. Serving as Greek tutor to the illustrious Petrarch, it is conceivable that his agnosticism about the possibility of man experiencing the immediate presence of God in this world (what I call “paradise”) was passed on to his pupil, soon to be known as the father of modern humanism.

And so, we not only have a moment when a new stage in the history of Christendom is discernable–what I called the symbolical birth of utopia–but also…

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